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Implant restorations are one of the most challenging and potentially rewarding areas of dentistry. This is a result of the technical complications, high variability between individual patients, and the possibility of collaborating with a specialist. Additionally, deciding whether to use a screw retained implant crown or a cement retained implant crown can be difficult.

screw retained implant crowns

When picking one or the other during your dental treatment, one of the most significant factors that should be considered is the location of the implant.

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Advantages and Disadvantages of a Screw Retained Implant Crown

It’s great that we have the opportunity to make a choice here depending on what we know is best for our patient.

The downside is that we have to consider all of the factors that might make us want to go with screw retained versus cement retain implant crowns.

Not that long ago, screw retained was the sole approach that was taken in these cases. Even now, it is more common because of the prevalence of implant failures that are caused by cement left behind.

Screw retained implant crowns have advantages and disadvantages that make them suited to very specific circumstances.

One advantage is that they can be used despite not having very much inter-occlusal distance. Also, there is no cement beneath gingival tissues that could function as an irritant. Finally, the retention is predictable and retrievability is high.

A disadvantage is that you have to place the screw emergence in such a way that the overall esthetics aren’t ruined in anterior cases. At the same time, you have to avoid premature fracture by creating enough thickness of restorative materials.

Next time, we’ll discuss the good and the bad of cement retained implants.

How do you normally orient your decision making process in these types of scenarios?

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